South Carolina

Dark Corner Day Trip

The Dark Corner of South Carolina has been shrouded in mystery for over 175 years.  Loosely defined, it’s the towns of Landrum, Gowensville and Glassy Mountain that make up the Dark Corner.  The area was named not from its reputation for moonshining as most people believe, but because in 1832 it was the only area that voted against the nullification act which gave South Carolina the right to ignore federal mandates.  A local politician said in one of his speeches that this was a dark corner where the light of Nullification could never shine. Thus the name the Dark Corner caught on. This article was published by ourupstateinfo.info and at See the South.

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Revolutionary War Sites in the Upstate

Independence Day, also known as July 4th, is when we, the citizens of the United States, celebrate our freedom from Great Britain.  It was marked by signing the Declaration of Independence in 1776 and we commemorate the event with parties, parades and fireworks. But did you know that there were more battles and skirmishes fought right here in South Carolina than in any other colony during the Revolutionary War? So to commemorate this year, plan a visit to one of these Upstate battlefields.

This article was published by ourupstateinfo.info and at See the South. For the whole article, click here.

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Meet Jefferson Davis at the Cross Keys House in Union

The Cross Keys home is considered one of the oldest and most significant homes in the Upstate of South Carolina. The Georgian Colonial mansions’ claim to fame is that Confederate President Jefferson Davis and his military escort ate lunch here on April 30, 1865 on their way out of Richmond, Virginia.  Mary Ann Bobo Whitmire Davis, who lived in the house at the time with the beautiful roofs if you want to avail why not try here- Palm Beach Roofing Expert, answered a knock at the door around mid-day and found five well-dressed men asking for a meal.  She didn’t realize who she had just served lunch to until Jefferson remarked as they were departing that they shared the same last name.

This article was published by ourupstateinfo.info and at See the South. For the whole article, click here.

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